The African American Struggle for High School Education in Loudoun County, VA, 1865 to 1941

Authors

  • Larry Roeder

Abstract

The Fourteenth Amendment is arguably one of the most important amendments to the U.S. Constitution. It addresses citizens’ rights and their equal protection under the law. In combination with other amendments, it has also led many in the country to the proposition that all American children—even those in the country without documentation illegally—should have equal educational opportunity despite differences in gender, race, ethnic background, religion, disability, or class. Despite this liberating legislation, African Americans have had to endure much poverty and prejudice to this day. In the following paper, Larry Roeder, principal investigator of the Edwin Washington Project, explores the educational experiences of African Americans in Loudoun County, Virginia, between 1830 and 1941. Roeder’s historical narrative is based on the study of thousands of documents and icons that he and his team have collected, organized, and analyzed, records that were lost for several decades and then almost destroyed. The scholarship contributes significantly to the growing body of research on African American citizens determined to realize their right to a high-quality education.

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Published

2021-11-16

How to Cite

Roeder, L. (2021). The African American Struggle for High School Education in Loudoun County, VA, 1865 to 1941. Country School Journal, 7. Retrieved from https://openjournals.utoledo.edu/index.php/countryschooljournal/article/view/532

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Articles